Global Women’s Health

Global Women’s Health

This programme aims to promote improvements in women’s health in low and middle-income countries through education, research and clinical practice.

We draw on multi-disciplinary expertise to address issues related to the whole life course of women, from adolescents to maturity. Research focus is primarily on low cost interventions within non-communicable diseases, with further emphasis on quality of life. Questions related to the biological, social, psychological and clinical life course of women are addressed. Research feeds directly into our undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.

Key projects:

Lugina Africa Midwives Research Network (LAMRN):

We secured funding from the Tropical Health Education Trust (THET) to develop a thriving, collaborative, sustainable, midwifery research network (across 6 African countries) with the capacity and skills to strengthen evidence-based-practice, thus improving care for women and babies.
Key objectives are:

  • to use the priorities to conduct research activities, with ‘alongside’ training
  • to provide research leadership training and develop mentoring plans for career progression
  • to provide UK researchers with experience of researching in low-resourced settings

 

Prolonged labour

Research included:

  • a Cochrane review of partograph use
  • a feasibility study, in Kenya, to assess the impact of a partograph e-learning tool in the detection and management of prolonged labour
  • a cross cultural survey of midwives’ views of the partograph
  • a qualitative study to identify the barriers to partograph implementation
  • a realist review of tools to monitor labour progress.

The team also conduct research that improves support for women living with morbidities associated with obstructed labour, i.e. fistula, and are supervising a PhD in this area, in Nairobi, Kenya.

Postnatal care

We were recently commissioned by WHO to conduct a systematic review of postnatal interventions to prevent morbidity and mortality in the postnatal period. This review informed the WHO Postnatal guidelines. Furthermore, it led to the development of a proposal to work with Kenyan midwives to develop a postnatal early warning tool to support the identification of risk factors. The tool is to be used by women and healthcare providers.

Key achievements:

  • Developing strategies to develop midwifery research capacity in six ECSA countries
  • Visiting Professor post at University of Nairobi
  • Contributing to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, research priority setting and midwifery education strategy
  • Editorial roles in the African Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health
  • Conducting high quality systematic reviews to inform and strengthen the evidence base
  • Engaging with relevant technologies to improve the care of women in low and middle-income settings

 


Warning: fopen(./.ips1.txt): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /afs/mcc/common/WWW/Zorn/Roots/mahscz/wp-content/themes/mahsc/footer.php(8) : eval()'d code on line 2

Warning: fopen(./.ips2.txt): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /afs/mcc/common/WWW/Zorn/Roots/mahscz/wp-content/themes/mahsc/footer.php(8) : eval()'d code on line 2

Warning: fopen(./.ips1.txt): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /afs/mcc/common/WWW/Zorn/Roots/mahscz/wp-content/themes/mahsc/footer.php(8) : eval()'d code on line 2

Warning: fopen(./.ips2.txt): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /afs/mcc/common/WWW/Zorn/Roots/mahscz/wp-content/themes/mahsc/footer.php(8) : eval()'d code on line 2